Oh, hello narcissism!

I don't often like to use innuendo in conversation, but I occasionally like to slip one in.
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Sometimes if you’re really lucky, you end up with two shit dads instead of one.

Sometimes you look at who they have in common, and wonder if you’re just a shit daughter.

Sometimes if you’re really lucky, you end up with two shit dads instead of one.

Sometimes you look at who they have in common, and wonder if you’re just a shit daughter.

One day they’re the better one. They’re smart, funny, quiet. When they speak, people hush up and pay attention.
They’re more “together” emotionally. They haven’t been privy to pesky childhood trauma. They’re healthier than you, in mind, body and soul.
You rely on them to be better than you.
Then one day you overtake in some small way. A tiny way. And it ripples.
It ripples in your confidence, your social life, your appetite for knowledge, for an audience.
When you talk, people hush up and listen.

There’s a balance, and it’s thrown the whole dynamic off.

deforest:

Joan Crawford’s famous Charleston kick as captured in the year 1926. 
Joan came to Hollywood in 1925 as a hard-knock Broadway chorus girl without censorship. She was a mascot of such favorite venues as the Cocoanut Grove and the Montmartre, where she would easily devastate her competition in countless Charleston contests. She collected more champion trophies than she knew what to do with. 
Her vigorous Charleston became legendary as astonishingly early as 1930. When the age of the flapper buckled to patronizing reconsideration, Joan and her verve remained substantial in the nostalgia for a lost era. “Remember when Joan Crawford was a ‘hotcha’ baby tearing up the floor at the Grove?” sighed fan magazines, newspaper columnists, writers, actors, directors, producers, crew members, and wistful fellow Jazz Age symbols. 
A rare exception in the Hollywood practice of impermanence, the memory of Joan as scalding “hey-hey” flapper of the Roaring Twenties never disappeared from the foreground. The beloved Crawford Charleston—breathless, stomping, panting, kicking, sweating, grinning, electrifying—has endured the restless American cultures of nearly nine decades. To this day it continues as an indestructible icon belling the legend of 1920s youth.

deforest:

Joan Crawford’s famous Charleston kick as captured in the year 1926.

Joan came to Hollywood in 1925 as a hard-knock Broadway chorus girl without censorship. She was a mascot of such favorite venues as the Cocoanut Grove and the Montmartre, where she would easily devastate her competition in countless Charleston contests. She collected more champion trophies than she knew what to do with.

Her vigorous Charleston became legendary as astonishingly early as 1930. When the age of the flapper buckled to patronizing reconsideration, Joan and her verve remained substantial in the nostalgia for a lost era. “Remember when Joan Crawford was a ‘hotcha’ baby tearing up the floor at the Grove?” sighed fan magazines, newspaper columnists, writers, actors, directors, producers, crew members, and wistful fellow Jazz Age symbols.

A rare exception in the Hollywood practice of impermanence, the memory of Joan as scalding “hey-hey” flapper of the Roaring Twenties never disappeared from the foreground. The beloved Crawford Charleston—breathless, stomping, panting, kicking, sweating, grinning, electrifying—has endured the restless American cultures of nearly nine decades. To this day it continues as an indestructible icon belling the legend of 1920s youth.

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

comedycentral:

Watch the whole thing here.

georgetakei:

This has become a thing. Cheez. http://ift.tt/17BkW1A

georgetakei:

This has become a thing. Cheez. http://ift.tt/17BkW1A

(via what-is-this-i-dont-even)

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential

When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.

But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in 99.99% percentile.

Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.

The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.

Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.

From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”

“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.

While the kids murmured, Juárez Correa went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.

When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.

“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.

A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.

“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”

Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.

“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.

As with most stories in the Mexican press — and with in the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.

The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.

Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.

Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.

Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We going to follow with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for updates.

Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

(via culpepper)

sushinfood:

noonewilleverfindmehere:

NO NO NO YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND THIS IS A REALLY FAMOUS ANIMATION FILM TECHNIQUE DONE BY ONE INSANE STUDIO YEARS AND YEARS AGO IN GERMANY, ONLY A FEW FILMS, BECAUSE OF HOW HARD THEY WERE TO MAKE.

EACH AND EVERY FRAME OF THESE MOVIES ARE OIL PAINTINGS ON GLASS.

holy

(via winonaryderscrazyeyes)

barefootdramaturg:

Helen Mirren by Giuliano Bekor

We should all be so lucky, to be as utterly radiantly fabulous as Dame Helen.

(via danmitchell)


Emma Watson for GQ British (October 2013)

Emma Watson for GQ British (October 2013)

(via what-is-this-i-dont-even)

violetimpudence:

sktagg23:

Dr. Seuss was not even in the general area of fucking around.

I tell people how unflinching Dr. Seuss’ war cartoons were and often they do not believe me. (Also, if you don’t own Dr. Seuss Goes To War you probably should.)

(via culpepper)

thedailywhat:

Single Topic Blog of the Day: 300 Sandwiches
The New York Post’s senior reporter Stephanie Smith’s boyfriend Eric has taken "Make Me a Sandwich" to a whole new level. After he jokingly told Smith that she was “300 sandwiches away from an engagement ring” in June 2012, Smith launched the blog 300 Sandwiches to document her journey of learning how to cook while earning wedded bliss. Today, after creating more than 176 sandwiches, Smith revealed her blog project in a column article on the New York Post, in which Eric was quoted as saying “[Men are] not complex. Just do something nice for us. Like make a sandwich.” Hat tip goes to Gawker!

I… Uuurghhh god I’m conflicted.

thedailywhat:

Single Topic Blog of the Day: 300 Sandwiches

The New York Post’s senior reporter Stephanie Smith’s boyfriend Eric has taken "Make Me a Sandwich" to a whole new level. After he jokingly told Smith that she was “300 sandwiches away from an engagement ring” in June 2012, Smith launched the blog 300 Sandwiches to document her journey of learning how to cook while earning wedded bliss. Today, after creating more than 176 sandwiches, Smith revealed her blog project in a column article on the New York Post, in which Eric was quoted as saying “[Men are] not complex. Just do something nice for us. Like make a sandwich.” Hat tip goes to Gawker!

I… Uuurghhh god I’m conflicted.

David DeAngelo, expert in douchery, has written a 10-point article about the art of talking to women… SEXUALLY. He uses the word so often in this piece that it’s impossible to read it without big caps and Zap Brannigan’s voice in your head.
You can read it over here … 

http://uk.askmen.com/top_10/dating_top_ten_100/133_dating_list_a.html

Let’s take a look at Dave’s advice for talking to women… SEXUALLY, point by point, and see where he might be going wrong.

"Did you know that talking about sex with a woman can be the first step to actually having it?" - It CAN be, if you’ve established a genuine connection and a mutual level of attraction. It CAN also be the first step to a woman pulling the rape alarm, too.

“Unfortunately, most guys screw up big time when they try to turn a conversation in that direction, and end up coming across as “creepy” or clueless.” - No kidding, Dave.

"The solution here is to learn how to flirt with a woman in a sexual way. Here are 10 tips to help you do so." - In a SEXUAL way, you say?

"Number 10
Speak in a sexy way
Think you can turn a woman on with a high-pitched, squeaky voice?” - Hey, it worked for Prince.

"Think again. Women pay more attention to your voice tone than to the words you speak." - Honestly, sometimes when men speak I’m so overcome with the SEXUALNESS of how men speak rather than what they say that I may as well be listening to Charlie Brown’s teacher.

"When you flirt with a woman in a sexual way, work on improving your delivery. Speak slowly, hold eye contact, deepen your voice and pause. But be careful not to be overdramatic and cheesy." - Dave, Dave. If you speak slowly with frequent pauses, a woman, or anyone, is going to think that either you’re slow, or you think they’re slow. OR that you think you’re a Brit abroad.

"Number 9
Accuse her of being the aggressor
One the best ways to get the fun started is to accuse a woman of trying to seduce you.” - … And that, M’Lord, is my defence.

"For example, if she mentions something about her house, such as, "I just moved into a new place," or, "Do you know how to install a wireless router?," say, "Wow, are you trying to get me to come over to your house already? I’m not surprised though." Women love it when men do this." - People I don’t really know being over familiar and patronising couldn’t dry up my vagina quicker, if I’m honest.

"Don’t be surprised if she really tries to get you to come over soon after!" - But DO be stunned by the pigs flying overhead and the seven circles of hell being chosen as the venue for the next Winter Olympics.

"Number 8
Imply that you’re a stud
Women want men who know how to please them, but you can’t come right out and say, “I’m a great lover.” Instead, use sexual innuendo to indirectly convey this message.” - In YOUR endo, Dave.

"For example, suppose you’re at your place making a drink for a woman and she says, "Wow, you’re good at that." Look at her square in the eye and say, "I’m good at a lot of things." - Like being modest. You’re the BEST at that.

"Number 7
Have her use you
Women accuse men of using them for sex all the time, so why not turn the tables?” - This can only go well for you, Dave.

"The next time you do something considerate for a woman," - AHAHAHA

" tell her, "So you’re using me already — next thing I know you’ll be trying to use me for other things as well." She’ll find this role-reversal hilarious," SHE ABSOLUTELY WILL. THAT’S HILARIOUS.

" and it’s a great way to bring up the topic of sex in a safe, fun and non-threatening way." - Dave, we need to go through the definitions of safe, fun and non-threatening.

"Number 6
Sex up boring conversation
When most men first meet a woman, they ask her typical, boring questions like, “Where are you from?” and “What do you do?” Women usually hate it when guys do this,” - Yes, people bothering to learn my name and what it is I do with my day is SO. DULL.

"but you can set yourself apart by using these drab questions to turn things in a sexual direction. For example, if you find out a woman is from Spain, you can say to her, "Hmm… you know what they say about women from Spain, don’t you?" - They… can probably speak Spanish?

"Then, let your sly smile and solid eye contact suggest that you know Spanish women are… well, let’s just say a lot of fun." - Do… Do Spanish women really like go-karting? Playing charades? I don’t get your meaning, Dave. YOU’RE TOO SUBTLE.

"Number 5
Bring sex into everyday chat
A great way to flirt sexually with a woman is to compare some “outside the bedroom” activities to “inside the bedroom” activities.” - As in sexual partners are like buses?

"For example, let’s suppose you bring a female guest a cup of tea. You can follow by saying, "Looks like you’re on the receiving end today. Do you always receive, or do you like to give at times, too?" - If you wanted a cup of tea, Dave, you should have put more water in the kettle.

"Crack a slight smile, and she will know exactly what you’re talking about." - Honestly, Dave, she probably will but she’ll have the good grace not to sully a sacred cup of tea by drawing attention to your creepy innuendo because you are just embarrassing yourself.

"Number 4
Offer to pay her back
Oftentimes, a woman will do something nice, then tease by saying, “That’s okay, you can pay me back later.” Why not make the currency sexual? Say something like, “Pay you back… ummm… I’m short on cash right now. Do you have any creative payment options in mind?” - OK, I want to set the record straight to every guy I’ve ever waived the cost of a Snickers bar to, that I do NOT want sexual payment. It’s just a Snickers. Besides, you save that kind of stuff for a ferrero rocher or a wagon wheel.

"Number 3
Tell her she’s naughty
Another fun way to tease a woman in a sexual way is to accuse her of being “naughty” in her everyday activities.” - Like I’m five.

"For example, if a woman tells you she was just in the shower," - Because showers are such a rarity that I must tell people when I have one.

" ask her how it was. If she gives any positive response, reply with something like, "Nice shower? Interesting. What exactly were you doing in there that made it so nice? I’m curious." - You spelt ‘predatory’ wrong.

"Number 2
Show that you’re sex-savvy
Want to know a secret about female sexuality that 99% of men don’t know?” - As a woman yourself, Dave, you MUST know. Please, enlighten us all.

"Here it is:" - CAN’T WAIT.

"Many women feel compelled to vacuum their house each month when they’re ovulating." - …

"Some experts believe it has something to do with wanting to "clean the nest" before laying her "egg." - I… That is not what I expected, and as for ‘some experts’, I’m going to need to see the empirical evidence on that.

"So when a woman tells you she is vacuuming, say "Vacuuming? What, are you ovulating or something?" - WHEN DOES A WOMAN EVER TELL ANYONE SHE’S VACUUMING? And when is appropriate response, "Oh. Riding the crimson wave, then?"

"She’ll be stunned that you know this, and she’ll wonder what else you know about female sexuality. Of course, if she doesn’t know what you mean, fill her in. Women love it when you teach them something new, especially about themselves." - No, wait, THIS is what dries my vagina up in an instant; someone who isn’t a woman, nor a biologist who specialises in female anatomy, explaining female sexuality and bodily functions, to a woman.

Well, Dave. We’re down to the final tip. You have failed to impress and enlighten thus far. Let’s hope you can pull a showstopper out for Number 1.

"Number 1
Find double meanings
The English language is literally packed with words you can twist around to create sexual meanings.” - LITERALLY.

Wet, juicy, hard, fast, hot…” - Moist, hymen, thyroid.

" the possibilities are endless. For example, if she says her drink is big, you can reply with something like "Big can be a good thing, don’t you think?" Once you start looking for opportunities, you’ll be surprised how easy it is to add a bit of sexuality to everyday conversations."

And once you start inserting SEX into every conversation you have with a woman, you’ll find that you’ll have vastly reduced your ability to hold a conversation with a woman. A fascinating, clever, funny woman who might have otherwise found you interesting and charming, but you spent the whole time referring to your dick.

Dave, you’re a snake oil salesman. You’ve identified lonely men and told them that casual sex is the answer to their problems. There’s nothing wrong with casual sex, it can be great, but in your article you have presented women as a simple puzzle. Women aren’t Rubix Cubes with boobs*, and you can’t just allude to sex with every woman you talk to with varying degrees of subtlety until the sex prize falls out. It’s insulting to the women who have to put up with the poor lonely bloke who thinks it’ll work, and it’s an insult to the good, thoughtful men who would never dream of putting a woman’s back up like that.

You know why? Because they all figured out that women are people too.

*BOOBIX CUBES